California Gold Surf Auction - Boardroom Show
California Gold Surf Auction premium surfboard auctions and surf memorabilia collectors providing perpetual access to the marketplace. With decades of historical expertise, and millions of dollars in sold inventory, California Gold Surf Auction are uniquely positioned to curate, preserve and share culturally significant surfboards and collectibles. Discretion, trust, and passion
vintage surfboards, surfing, surf auctions, surf memorabilia, California Gold Surf Auction, premium vintage surf, california gold, selling surfboards, buying surfboards,
23790
page-template-default,page,page-id-23790,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.12,vc_responsive

California Gold Surf Auction


The California Gold Surf Auction serves the global audience of premium surfboard and surf memorabilia collectors providing perpetual access to the marketplace. With decades of historical expertise, and millions of dollars in sold inventory, we are uniquely positioned to curate, preserve and share culturally significant surfboards and collectibles. Discretion, trust, and passion are foundational pillars our buyers and sellers count on to maintain the integrity of the market and their investments. Our constantly adapting technological innovation allows around the clock access and the ability to be involved anyplace, anywhere, anytime.

MARK FOO’S PERSONAL PAT RAWSON GUN
Sold $6,500
Pre-auction Est.
$2,500 – $3,500
Timed Auction

MOTIVATED SELLERS AT THE BOARDROOM SHOW

Size
8’0″
Description
8’0″ BLUE HAWAII Shaped by Pat Rawson. Mark Foo’s personal board. Super cool purple and yellow “FOO” spray on deck , clear bottom with slight rail color over lap. Mark Foo’s sponsor logos intact.
Condition
8.5 all original, some wear and tear, a slight deck crease. Average sun shading on bottom. Superb deck coloring.
Signature
Yes Pat Rawson
Provenance
This board and its owner are filled with legend and lore. The board was displayed on the North Shore at Mark Foo’s house (one of two identically sprayed Rawson’s on display at Foo’s sister bed n breakfast). Intelligent, driven, and dependable, well versed in the language of marketing, Mark Foo became one of the first surfers to be sponsored by a nonsurfing corporation, signing a modest deal with the Anheuser-Busch brewery in mid-1981. If Foo was at times opportunistic, even crass, he also had a great appreciation of surfing’s mystery, power, and beauty. “How can you describe the feeling of looking into a 30-foot tube, like a hole in the ocean?” Foo rhetorically asked in a surf magazine article. “How do I convey the sights, sounds and sensations that just a handful of humans out of the billions of humans past, present and future will ever experience? What’s it like to walk on the moon, Mr. Armstrong?” Foo gained notice as a big-wave rider on January 18, 1985, when he paddled into the teeth of a 50-foot Waimea closeout set, and shortly after, with hundreds of people on the beach watching, tried to ride a 30-footer. He didn’t make the wave, but wrote about the experience for the surf press, and would later memorably describe the waves he’d seen that day at Waimea as belonging to “the unridden realm.” A feud had meanwhile developed between Foo and Texas-born big-wave rider Ken Bradshaw, and in 1988 the two were profiled in an Outside magazine feature titled “The Divided Rulers of Waimea Bay.” In that article, and in dozens of private and public conversations, Foo talked about the possibility of dying in big surf, telling one TV interviewer that “it would be a glamorous way to go, a great way to go; I mean, that’s how I’d like to go out.” Foo also acknowledged that he was an unlikely big-wave rider, as he was afraid of heights and speed, and didn’t think of himself as athletically inclined. Foo was the first to ride a tri-fin surfboard at Waimea, and was the first to use a leash in big surf. In 1986, he finished runner-up to Clyde Aikau in the Quiksilver in Memory of Eddie Aikau contest at Waimea; he also competed in the 1990 Quiksilver/Aikau event. Foo visited Maverick’s for the first time on December 23, 1994, flying over from Hawaii with rival-turned-friend Ken Bradshaw, and died after wiping out on a 15-foot wave; the evidence wasn’t conclusive, but he was probably driven to the bottom, where his leash or surfboard snagged on an outcrop of rock, and he drowned. He was engaged to be married. Along with lengthy write-ups in the surf press, Foo’s death was covered by the network news, MTV, the New York Times (who described him in a detailed obituary as “the Joe Montana of big waves”), the Los Angeles Times, Outside, Rolling Stone, Spin, and Paris Match magazines. Foo is the central character in the 2000-published Maverick’s: The Story of Big-Wave Surfing. Foo’s rivalry with Bradshaw is chronicled Andy Martin’s 2007 book Stealing the Wave: The Epic Struggle Between Ken Bradshaw and Mark Foo (Bloomsbury).— courtesy Matt Warshaw’s Encyclopedia of Surfing

Sign up for our newsletter